Project Management Skills Training – Five Key Project Management Stages

by ltconsulting on September 18, 2012

Managing projects is not easy, but it is a crucial task in the workplace. Our Project Management training course will present delegates with useful strategies that will assist them with:

  • organising projects
  • improving project management skills
  • managing projects effectively
  • project planning
  • becoming a great project manager

With ever-increasing workloads and deadlines, the ability to manage our time has never been more important. Project management is a crucial factor in work and our project management courses are created to ensure that delegates can make their work based projects as efficient and effective as possible. We do this by supplying a project management training course that is full of tools and tips for improving project planning, time planning, delegation, organisation and management strategies, managing meetings, as well as handling and using time effectively. Our Project Management Course will cover subjects such as goal setting, improving organisation skills and managing time successfully. Our seminars are packed with useful tips and techniques that allow you to become a better project manager instantly.

Five Key Project Management Stages

To give your project every chance of success you will need a staged process to work through, to ensure that all the requirements of effective project management are covered.

1.    Project definition and proposal

This is when you develop the purpose of the project into an initial definition of potential gain against time and cost required. You then create an initial strategy and skills profile to achieve the defined results. This creates your proposal that is verified by the project stakeholders.

2.    Overview planning

The project is broken down into a sequence of activities that allow you to oversee the project and communicate this breakdown to the project team.

3.    Detailed planning and scheduling

Once the overall plan has been agreed you begin to detail the specifications for each of the major activities, agree objectives with the key staff responsible and for each activity, budget for the resources required, and create a project summary sheet for use during the implementation stage.

4.    Managing and monitoring the project implementation

Once work begins, your role is to co-ordinate progress and control quality, time and cost factors. You need to get and give feedback on progress, inspect results, negotiate for resources, and resolve any conflict or problems threatening to delay the progress of your project.

5.    Post implementation review

This is where you check results against the quality targets from your specifications, ensuring that all objectives have been met within planned times, and analyse budget outcomes. You then report results to senior management and other interested parties, giving full recognition to staff for achievement.

Exercise – analysing previous projects

Think of a task your team at work had to carry out recently as a project and briefly describe the task. Answer the questions set out below.

The task was ………

1) How was it planned?

2) Was there a schedule?

3) Where there clear objectives?

4) How did you know when it was completed?

The course is designed to help delegates organise their workload while planning a project. This is done with the aid of Gantt charts and project management templates, tools and techniques. This course is also a great option if you seek project management for junior staff in the workplace as it will informatively aid staff in planning successful projects.

There are many benefits of being a project manager such as; better task management; increased self esteem; the ability to negotiate more effectively and reduce the stress which results from a lack of effective planning.

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